Jun 19, 2014 by Lee Hart

Agrifac sprayers testing Canadian waters

Lars Stadman came all the way from Holland to Regina, Sask. this week to tell Western Canadian farmers his company makes an excellent high clearance field sprayer.

Stadman, is sort of a soloist hoping to standout amid a symphony of product pitches and well staged machinery displays at the

Lars Stadman introducing Canadian farmers to the Agrifac field sprayer

Lars Stadman introducing Canadian farmers to the Agrifac field sprayer

Canadian Farm Progress Show. He manned a simple, yet effective booth in a busy section of the show hoping to explain to prairie farmers what the Agrifac field sprayer is all about.

“We’ve been in business in Europe for many years, but this is the first time we have introduced our sprayers to Canadian farmers,” says Stadman, sales manager for Agrifac. The company actually started with backpack style potato sprayers in 1939 and today manufacture a line of self-propelled high clearance sprayers well received across Europe, and quite capable of handling Canadian crop and field conditions.

“In Holland farmers might first think here is a machine that costs more than other field sprayers, but then they get into the cab and see it operate and they know they are getting good value for their money,” says Stadman.

The Agrifac field sprayer has a marketing catch phrase “Brilliant Simple”. It is smart and attractive in appearance, and extremely simple to operate, says Stadman. “It is developed in line with the “4Es for growers” concept —efficiency, economy, ergronomy and ecology. They are extremely well built, they have high capacity, (tank sizes ranging from 3,400 to 8000 litres), they are efficient with excellent coverage at spraying speeds of up to 40 kilometres per hour (24 mph), and they are simple and very comfortable to operate.”

Built on a chassis specifically designed for a high clearance sprayer, the Agrifac machines come with boom widths ranging from 24 to 51 metres (78 to 167 feet). The machine itself can be steplessly adjusted for crop clearance under the chassis from 140 cm (55 inches) up to 200 cm (78 inches) in height. And the wheelbase can also be steplessly adjusted from 74 to 104 inches in width. The boom itself can be raised to 345 cm or 11.3 feet for clearance over tall crops such as corn and sunflowers.

Agrifac machines also offer improved spray technology, says Stadman. With a range of sectional boom options, air and water are mixed inside each nozzle to produce a uniform droplet size, with good penetration into the crop canopy, and much less drift even when operated at higher speeds. “As farmers change their operating speeds in the field, the sprayer technology automatically adjusts to maintain spray quality,” says Stadman.

If Stadman gets a sense that Canadian farmers would like to see and learn more about the Agrifac sprayer, he’ll plan to be back with machines to demo and hopefully establish a dealer network.

For more information on the Agrifac sprayers visit the company website at www.agrifac.com and/or email Stadman at [email protected]

Lee Hart is a field editor for Grainews in Calgary, Contact him at 403-592-1964 or by email at [email protected]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lee Hart

Lee Hart


Lee Hart is a long-time farm writer, and honorary member of the Alberta Institute of Agrologists, with many observations on the agriculture industry, who never hesitates to admit he is wrong (should that ever happen.)


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